Author - Doug George

Matching Your Camera to Your Optics

by Douglas George In order to get the best results from your equipment, it is important to match the resolution of your camera to the resolution of your optics. In conventional photography your lenses are highly adaptable, with adjustable f/ratio and often zoom capability (adjustable focal length).  On dedicated science instruments such as telescopes and microscopes...

Our COVID-19 Protective Measures

During these unprecedented circumstances, we at Diffraction Limited are taking all precautions to ensure the health and safety of our employees and customers. We are monitoring the situation closely and making sure all our employees are diligent about their own safety and that of our customers. We have established stringent guidelines to ensure all our...

CCD versus CMOS: Which is Better?

by Doug George. The Charge Coupled Device (known as a CCD) has dominated astronomy and consumer electronics for nearly five decades. That is changing. The Nobel prize winning CCD was invented in 1969 and became a mature technology after about 20 years. CCD cameras gained wide acceptance for still imaging, video, and photometric measurements, replacing the...

Preventing Frost

by Doug George. Some people ask, "Why do we use desiccant plugs?" Simply put, they minimize life cycle cost and downtime. The imaging sensor needs to be below freezing in order to control dark current and noise.  If the sensor is exposed to the atmosphere it will quickly be encased in ice. This not only ruins the...

Dragonfly 44 Discovery

The Dragonfly Array consists of two telescope mounts, each carrying 24 ultra high contrast lenses. These off-the-shelf Canon lenses use new nano-fabricated coatings with sub-wavelength structure on the optical glass, which has unprecedented performance in reducing stray light and reflections. On the back of each of these 48 lenses is an SBIG STT-8300M camera. The purpose...

How to Choose a CCD Camera

by Michael Barber Guidelines for selecting the best camera for your telescope and observing conditions: This section outlines some of the basic issues one should consider when making a camera selection:  Cost, size, field of view, sensitivity, resolution, cooling, guiding and software. 1.  Cost / Size The best camera for you isn't always the biggest or most expensive.  An expensive camera with...